CPSC Prohibits Certain Phthalates in Children’s Toys and Child Care Products



WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) voted 3 to 2 on October 18, 2017 to issue a final rule prohibiting children’s toys and child care articles containing more than 0.1 percent of certain phthalate chemicals. The rule will take effect 180 days after publication in the Federal Register.

Phthalates are used to make vinyl and other plastics soft and pliable. Ingestion of certain phthalates can have harmful health effects on children.

The Commission’s final rule bans children’s toys and child care articles containing more than 0.1 percent of five specific phthalate chemicals.  The rule is based on recommendations from a Chronic Hazard Advisory Panel (CHAP), which examined the health effects of phthalates in children’s toys and child care articles.  Based on the CHAP’s report, CPSC majority determined that these five phthalate chemicals cause harmful effects on male reproductive development:

  1. di-isononyl phthalate (DINP);
  2. di-n-pentyl phthalate (DPENP);
  3. di-n-hexyl phthalate (DHEXP);
  4. dicyclohexyl phthalate (DCHP); or,
  5. diisobutyl phthalate (DIBP).

Congress permanently prohibited children’s toys and child care articles containing concentrations of more than 0.1 percent of three additional phthalates in the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008 (CPSIA):

  1. di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP);
  2. dibutyl phthalate (DBP); or,
  3. benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP)

The final rule brings to eight the total number of phthalates that are restricted from use in children’s toys and child care articles at concentrations of more than 0.1 percent. 


CONTINUE READING ON www.cpsc.gov

                   

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