US EPA Seeks Input from State Partners on Lead and Copper Rule



The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sent letters to state partners on forthcoming proposed regulatory revisions to the existing  Lead and Copper Rule (LCR). These changes are intended to not only improve the protection of public health, but the effective implementation of the rule as well.

“Despite lead contaminated sites being an environmental threat to our country, EPA has not updated the Lead and Copper Rule in decades,” said EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt. “In keeping with our commitment to cooperative federalism, EPA is seeking input from state stakeholders on proposed revisions to properly address lead and ensure communities have access to safe drinking water.”

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there is no level of exposure to lead that is safe – especially for children. Established in 1991, the LCR intends to reduce exposure to lead and copper through drinking water whether from corrosion control measures for lead service lines or transparency and public education.

The LCR is applicable to all community public water systems. It requires water systems to sample water from households with plumbing materials that contain lead or copper and take action to reduce exposure to these harmful metals in drinking water.

The letter from Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water invites partner organizations to a 60-day period that will kick off with a joint meeting followed by discussions with each of the groups on the proposed rule, including a range of state and professional groups.


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