U.S. EPA Releases Annual Toxic Release Inventory for Nation’s Pacific Southwest Region


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SAN FRANCISCO – Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the latest annual Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) National Analysis, covering 2018. Findings from this most recent publicly available report show an increase in recycling of TRI chemical wastes nationwide and indicate that companies continue to find ways to implement new source reduction activities and reduce the quantities of TRI chemicals they release into the environment.

“By providing the data in the TRI National Analysis, EPA is empowering communities to protect their environment and providing companies with the information they need to work toward a stronger future,” said EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler. “The latest TRI data continues to demonstrate that under President Trump environmental stewardship and economic growth continue to go hand in hand.”

Along with the 2018 TRI National Analysis, EPA is publishing a new tool on the TRI website to help explain the data reported by the metal mining sector. EPA’s new interactive graphic—which was developed with input from stakeholders—explains how metal mines operate, and generally how and where releases of TRI-listed chemicals happen.

“The Toxics Release Inventory provides the public in America’s Pacific Southwest with important environmental data that can be used to learn more about facilities in their communities,” said Pacific Southwest Acting Regional Administrator Deborah Jordan. “Overall national trends in the data indicate facilities are recycling more, which is good for the economy and the environment in our region and across the U.S.”

In Nevada, 141 facilities reported 339 million pounds of TRI chemical releases for 2018, a 14 percent decrease from 2017. The highest releases in Nevada are driven by the mining sector, which reported large quantities contained in the ore and waste rock.  In 2018, five TRI reporting facilities in Nevada implemented new source reduction activities. 

CONTINUE READING ON www.epa.gov

                   

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