Freshlawblog | February 2021 update: Key Developments in UK and EU Environment Safety and Health Law Procedure and Policy


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Our Environmental, Safety & Health team is pleased to share with you the latest edition of our monthly newsletter, frESH Law Horizons: Key Developments in UK & EU Environment, Safety and Health Law and Procedure; providing bite-size updates on EU and UK law, procedure and policy.

This month’s edition includes the following:

(*) COVID-19 route maps published.
(*) Consultation issued on proposed amendments to domestic food law.
(*) Home Office launches registry for Modern Slavery Act 2015 statements.
(*) UK Supreme Court reverses court of appeal decision in Okpabi Nigerian pollution case.
(*) The Dasgupta Review calls for changes in how we think, act and measure economic success to protect and enhance biodiversity.
(*) The Interim Environmental Governance Secretariat (IEGS) is now open.
(*) Draft regulations for UK emissions trading scheme (UKETS) auctioning have been published, and UKETS guidance has been updated.
(*) Government circular confirms “nearly zero” energy requirements for new buildings.
(*) Recent EA high-profile publications and statements highlight a number of key issues.
(*) New UK-only system to apply for RoHS exemptions is launched.
(*) A new report on UK Regulation after Brexit. Council serves injunction on illegal waste site in Kent.
(*) 25 businesses and chemical industry associations write to government calling for a re-think on post-Brexit chemicals regime.
(*) EU Court’s advisor suggests the Commission’s decision refusing to review the authorisation of the plasticiser DEHP (bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate) should be annulled.
(*) EU court dismisses appeal regarding the authorisation of lead chromate pigments, confirms burden of proof for REACH authorisations.
(*) EU member states further discuss position on chemicals strategy.
(*) ECHA committee agrees with new classification of Bisphenol A (BPA).
(*) Discussions around the Single-use Plastics Directive continue.

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