Liquid metal synthesis for better piezoelectrics: Atomically-thin tin-monosulfide


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An RMIT-UNSW collaboration has applied liquid-metal synthesis to piezoelectrics, advancing future flexible, wearable electronics, and biosensors drawing their power from the body's movements.

Materials such as atomically thin tin mono-sulphide (SnS) are predicted to exhibit strong piezoelectric properties, converting mechanical forces or movement into electrical energy. This property, along with their inherent flexibility, makes them likely candidates for developing flexible nanogenerators that could be used in wearable electronics or internal, self-powered biosensors.

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