Canada | Final Screening Assessment for Substances Identified as Being of Low Concern Using the Ecological Risk Classification of Inorganic Substances and Three Human Health Science Approaches




Synopsis

Pursuant to sections 68 or 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of 21 substances. These substances were identified as priorities for assessment as they met categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA or were considered a priority on the basis of other human health concerns. The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Numbers and their Domestic Substances List (DSL) names are listed in the table below.

Substances assessed using the ecological risk classification of inorganic substances and one of three human health science approaches
CAS RNDSL name
409-21-2Silicon carbide (SiC)
513-77-9Carbonic acid, barium salt (1:1)
1313-27-5aMolybdenum oxide (MoO3)
1317-33-5Molybdenum sulfide  (MoS2)
1345-24-0C.I. Pigment Red 109
7440-31-5Tin
7440-41-7Beryllium
7553-56-2Iodine
7681-11-0potassium iodide (KI)
7681-82-5

Sodium iodide  (NaI)

7722-84-1Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)
7727-18-6vanadium trichloride oxide
7727-43-7Sulfuric acid, barium salt (1:1)
7789-20-0Water-d2 
10361-37-2Barium chloride (BaCl2)
11099-11-9Vanadium oxide
12713-03-0bUmber
17194-00-2barium hydroxide  (Ba(OH)2)

[...]

4. Conclusion

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this screening assessment, there is low risk of harm to the environment from the 21 substances in this assessment. It is concluded that these substances do not meet the criteria under paragraphs 64(a) or (b) of CEPA as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

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